History

The transport of containers between Rotterdam and Twente started in the mid 80s of last century. Including the initiative “Eurregio” there have been various initiatives in the late 90s, both by rail and by barge, which mainly for cost reasons all stranded.

Start in 1997

In 1997, CTT (Combi Terminal Twente) made a start at the port of Almelo with a new approach: the train was replaced by an inland connection. This resulted in a substantial advantage; a barge can  simply moor at several terminals to pick up and drop off containers  without additional costs for transfer and road transport, as opposed to the train, which was mainly used at that time.

Terminal Hengelo 2001

Pending on the development of a new, better-equipped terminal in Twente an alternative way to ship via the German Emmerich had to been made because of deficiencies in the Almelo waterway. With the increasing importance for shippers of cheap and sustainable implementation of transport CTT started in 2001 , partly built on the initiative of Akzo Nobel Chemicals, the Grolsch brewery and 30 other  industrial companies in Twente, a container terminal in Hengelo. When realizing also various authorities where involved, such as ‘Rijkswaterstaat’ and the ‘Provincie Overijssel’.

Expansion

Since the container terminal in Hengelo was commissioned the volume of activity increased significantly. It led in 2012 to a substantial expansion of the facilities in Hengelo, with automatic entrance street, an enlargement of the quay and an extension of the area of 26,000 sqm to 125,000 sqm. The expansion was opened on September 27, 2012 by His Royal Highness Willem-Alexander, at that time the Prince.

New locations

In addition to the expansion of the container terminal in Hengelo, CTT opened a number of new establishments that primarily serve as storage and transshipment terminals. A new container terminal in Rotterdam started on January 1 2013, with next to a road and water supply also a rail connection. In 2014-2015 there were another two container terminals at Almelo and Bad Bentheim (Germany).